Beverly Hills Cop

Rating:7.2
Released:1984
Genres:Action, Comedy, Crime
Crew:Producer: Jerry Bruckheimer | Production Design: Angelo P. Graham | Director: Martin Brest | Producer: Don Simpson | Story: Danilo Bach | Screenplay: Daniel Petrie Jr. | Story: Daniel Petrie Jr. | Director of Photography: Bruce Surtees | Original Music Composer: Harold Faltermeyer | Editor: Arthur Coburn

Trailer

 

Synopsis

The heat is on in this fast paced action-comedy starring Eddie Murphy as Axel Foley, a street smart Detroit cop tracking down his best friend's killer in Beverly Hills. Axel quickly learns that his wild style doesn't fit in with the Beverly Hills Police Department, which assigns two officers (Judge Reinhold & John Ashton) to make sure things don't get out of hand. Dragging the stuffy detectives along for the ride, Axel smashes through a huge culture clash in his hilarious, high-speed pursuit of justice. Featuring cameos by Paul Reiser, Bronson Pinchot and Damon Wayans, Beverly Hills Cop is an exhilarating, sidesplitting adventure.




Movie Images

Producer: <strong>Jerry Bruckheimer</strong> | Production Design: <strong>Angelo P. Graham</strong> | Director: <strong>Martin Brest</strong> | Producer: <strong>Don Simpson</strong> | Story: <strong>Danilo Bach</strong> | Screenplay: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Story: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Director of Photography: <strong>Bruce Surtees</strong> | Original Music Composer: <strong>Harold Faltermeyer</strong> | Editor: <strong>Arthur Coburn</strong> imageProducer: <strong>Jerry Bruckheimer</strong> | Production Design: <strong>Angelo P. Graham</strong> | Director: <strong>Martin Brest</strong> | Producer: <strong>Don Simpson</strong> | Story: <strong>Danilo Bach</strong> | Screenplay: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Story: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Director of Photography: <strong>Bruce Surtees</strong> | Original Music Composer: <strong>Harold Faltermeyer</strong> | Editor: <strong>Arthur Coburn</strong> imageProducer: <strong>Jerry Bruckheimer</strong> | Production Design: <strong>Angelo P. Graham</strong> | Director: <strong>Martin Brest</strong> | Producer: <strong>Don Simpson</strong> | Story: <strong>Danilo Bach</strong> | Screenplay: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Story: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Director of Photography: <strong>Bruce Surtees</strong> | Original Music Composer: <strong>Harold Faltermeyer</strong> | Editor: <strong>Arthur Coburn</strong> imageProducer: <strong>Jerry Bruckheimer</strong> | Production Design: <strong>Angelo P. Graham</strong> | Director: <strong>Martin Brest</strong> | Producer: <strong>Don Simpson</strong> | Story: <strong>Danilo Bach</strong> | Screenplay: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Story: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Director of Photography: <strong>Bruce Surtees</strong> | Original Music Composer: <strong>Harold Faltermeyer</strong> | Editor: <strong>Arthur Coburn</strong> imageProducer: <strong>Jerry Bruckheimer</strong> | Production Design: <strong>Angelo P. Graham</strong> | Director: <strong>Martin Brest</strong> | Producer: <strong>Don Simpson</strong> | Story: <strong>Danilo Bach</strong> | Screenplay: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Story: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Director of Photography: <strong>Bruce Surtees</strong> | Original Music Composer: <strong>Harold Faltermeyer</strong> | Editor: <strong>Arthur Coburn</strong> imageProducer: <strong>Jerry Bruckheimer</strong> | Production Design: <strong>Angelo P. Graham</strong> | Director: <strong>Martin Brest</strong> | Producer: <strong>Don Simpson</strong> | Story: <strong>Danilo Bach</strong> | Screenplay: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Story: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Director of Photography: <strong>Bruce Surtees</strong> | Original Music Composer: <strong>Harold Faltermeyer</strong> | Editor: <strong>Arthur Coburn</strong> imageProducer: <strong>Jerry Bruckheimer</strong> | Production Design: <strong>Angelo P. Graham</strong> | Director: <strong>Martin Brest</strong> | Producer: <strong>Don Simpson</strong> | Story: <strong>Danilo Bach</strong> | Screenplay: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Story: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Director of Photography: <strong>Bruce Surtees</strong> | Original Music Composer: <strong>Harold Faltermeyer</strong> | Editor: <strong>Arthur Coburn</strong> imageProducer: <strong>Jerry Bruckheimer</strong> | Production Design: <strong>Angelo P. Graham</strong> | Director: <strong>Martin Brest</strong> | Producer: <strong>Don Simpson</strong> | Story: <strong>Danilo Bach</strong> | Screenplay: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Story: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Director of Photography: <strong>Bruce Surtees</strong> | Original Music Composer: <strong>Harold Faltermeyer</strong> | Editor: <strong>Arthur Coburn</strong> imageProducer: <strong>Jerry Bruckheimer</strong> | Production Design: <strong>Angelo P. Graham</strong> | Director: <strong>Martin Brest</strong> | Producer: <strong>Don Simpson</strong> | Story: <strong>Danilo Bach</strong> | Screenplay: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Story: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Director of Photography: <strong>Bruce Surtees</strong> | Original Music Composer: <strong>Harold Faltermeyer</strong> | Editor: <strong>Arthur Coburn</strong> imageProducer: <strong>Jerry Bruckheimer</strong> | Production Design: <strong>Angelo P. Graham</strong> | Director: <strong>Martin Brest</strong> | Producer: <strong>Don Simpson</strong> | Story: <strong>Danilo Bach</strong> | Screenplay: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Story: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Director of Photography: <strong>Bruce Surtees</strong> | Original Music Composer: <strong>Harold Faltermeyer</strong> | Editor: <strong>Arthur Coburn</strong> imageProducer: <strong>Jerry Bruckheimer</strong> | Production Design: <strong>Angelo P. Graham</strong> | Director: <strong>Martin Brest</strong> | Producer: <strong>Don Simpson</strong> | Story: <strong>Danilo Bach</strong> | Screenplay: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Story: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Director of Photography: <strong>Bruce Surtees</strong> | Original Music Composer: <strong>Harold Faltermeyer</strong> | Editor: <strong>Arthur Coburn</strong> imageProducer: <strong>Jerry Bruckheimer</strong> | Production Design: <strong>Angelo P. Graham</strong> | Director: <strong>Martin Brest</strong> | Producer: <strong>Don Simpson</strong> | Story: <strong>Danilo Bach</strong> | Screenplay: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Story: <strong>Daniel Petrie Jr.</strong> | Director of Photography: <strong>Bruce Surtees</strong> | Original Music Composer: <strong>Harold Faltermeyer</strong> | Editor: <strong>Arthur Coburn</strong> image


Reviews

John Chard

The heat is on - indeed!

Cocky rule dodging Detroit Cop Axel Foley (Eddie Murphy) heads to Beverly Hills in search of those responsible for murdering his friend. Upon getting there he falls foul of everyone he meets due to his tough Detroit approach work. Undaunted, Foley, aided by old friend Jenny Summers (Lisa Eilbacher) and two intrigued local detectives, starts to unravel the mystery.

Hey Axel you got a cigarette?

There was a time when Eddie Murphy ruled the world. After Trading Places had introduced us to his sharp comedic tongue, and 48 Hours had shown him to be a more than capable action character actor, Beverly Hills Cop fused the two together and propelled Murphy to super stardom. Directed by Martin Brest and produced by Messers Simpson & Bruckheimer, it's really no surprise that "Hills Cop" is shallow, simple (a fish out of water comedy standard) and utterly commercial. Yet with its gusto, humorous script (Daniel Petrie Jr) and neat plotting, it becomes a hugely entertaining film - led superbly by Murphy due to infectious comedy energy and superb knack for timing.

You're not going to fall for the banana in the tailpipe routine!

It's hard to believe that the likes of Sly Stallone and Al Pacino were first mooted for the role, so not as a comedy one imagines, but as it being a standard police action movie, but enter Murphy and it ended up as a fine blend of action and comedy. There's little digs at Beverly Hills and its smugness, a way of life that Foley, with his down on the streets toughness, can't comprehend, while opposing police methods also get a wry once over - wonderfully threaded in the relationship between Foley, Taggart (John Ashton) and Rosewood (Judge Reinhold).

Small gripes reside, such as Steven Berkoff's by the numbers villain being something of a let down and Ronny Cox is sadly playing filler time with an underwritten character. But this is about Murphy, the fabulous stunt work and the successful union of action and comedy. And hey! even Harold Faltermeyer's bobbing synth score, "Axel F," has a nippiness that remains quintessentially 1980s. 8/10


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